The Stress and Opposition of New

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The Stress and Opposition of New

By: Pastor Don

 

A New Year is upon us, and with it comes so many NEW opportunities.  We like to focus on new beginnings—because who doesn’t like something new.  But “new” can also breed uncertainty and unpredictability.   Remember what Forrest Gump’s mother said, “Life is like a box of chocolates… you never know what you’re gonna get.”  Not knowing can be stress inducing, and we’re prone to play defense against the unknowns.

I’ve been reading The Book of Joy by Bishop Desmond Tutu and the Dalai Lama with Douglas Abrams, and in it Bishop Tutu said, “that nothing beautiful, in the end comes without a measure of some pain, some frustration, some suffering.”  He went on to talk about a lesson he learned from prenatal researcher Pathik Wadhwa, who noted that the stress and opposition of our prenatal development are exactly what initiate our development in utero.  Our stem cells do not differentiate to become us without stress to encourage them to do so.  The Bishop said: “without stress and opposition, complex life like ours would never have developed.  We would never have come into being.” (pg. 45).

I remember reading something like this while helping Zachary study biology last semester.  Cell division (growth) is stimulated when injury occurs.  When there is a cut in the skin, or a break in a bone, cells at the edges of the injury are stimulated to divide rapidly.  Growth occurs through stress and opposition.

I like to remember God’s word through the prophet Isaiah, “See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the wilderness and streams in the wasteland.” (43: 9) And Jesus’ words in Revelation, “Behold, I am making all things new” (21:5).

The new think God is doing, and the way Jesus is making all things new sounds so good!  It’s like the “newness” of all those new Christmas presents.  But what about those times when “new” brings stress and opposition?  When the uncertainty and unpredictability of “new” squeezes the comfort out of our existence?

Maybe those are exactly the ways God go is using to grow us.  It’s at the edge of injury that growth occurs; it’s by stress growth is initiated; it’s in the face of opposition that growth is strengthened.  And it’s in those places of injury, stress, opposition, uncertainty and unpredictability that Jesus says, “fear not! for I am with you.”  Remember God is doing a new thing; Jesus is making all things new, and growth is happening, even amidst some measure of pain, frustration, and suffering.

Thank you for sharing the Joy of Jesus

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On behalf of the mission committee I want to say “Thanks” to this congregation for their generosity. In 2016, you have given over $140,000 to 30 different agencies/missions to assist people in need and to witness to Jesus Christ. Praise be to God! Some of those funds were given directly to designated charities through the church while others were given to the general mission fund and then disbursed to the agencies through the committee.  Additionally, over twenty-two thousand dollars was given to O’Fallon residents who come into our church office asking for help with their utility bills, water bills or rent.  Your financial donations have helped support scholarships for students in Africa wishing to attend the Methodist seminary there, and to support Connie Wieck,our missionary in China.

Because of your generosity, 229 local children will be smiling on Christmas morning when they open gifts that they wouldn’t have, if not for your generosity. Another, 161 children in other countries will get to experience the thrill of receiving Christmas gifts because of the shoeboxes you filled. Many of you attended the Ugandan Thunder Children’s Choir and gave to help support the orphans living in Uganda. Some agreed to sponsor a Ugandan orphan through monthly donations.

Countless pairs of shoes have been donated throughout the year (just ask John Grissom) to provide shoes and clean water for people overseas. You left food for the food pantry,  brought supplies to assist flood victims, and donated many needed items to the Violence Prevention Center and Holy Angels Shelter. During the summer months when needy children are not being fed school lunches, you made lunches and distributed them. You bought cinnamon rolls and breads so that that formerly homeless people could now have a paying job at Bridge Bread. This gives them a purpose in life and a roof over their head.

In August, over 100 members of our church turned out to volunteer and participate in Running 4 God so that funds could be raised for the Lessie Bates Davis Neighborhood House, and therefore, help people striving to get out of poverty. Additionally, there are individual Sunday School classes and small groups of our members doing Christ’s work such as providing Thanksgiving meals for the homeless in East St. Louis, holding bake sales for the food pantry, or making prayer shawls and turbans for women with cancer. Many attended the Trivia Night and bought baskets there to help support the youth mission trip.

Some of us might be hurting from the loss of a loved one, financial problems, serious health concerns, divorce, emotional turmoil or for other reasons. One thing we can take comfort in is that we belong to a caring church that wraps it’s arms around us at a time when we are in need. There are Stephen Ministers and individual members who are always willing to give comfort.

This congregation is a generous one who believes in sharing their wealth and talents. As Paulyn Snyder, Director of Holy Angels Shelter, expressed to me in an email after the mission fair, “It was very inspiring to see the interest and deep concern your whole Church family has for God’s People, wherever they are and whoever they are. That is indeed an awesome testimony to the very Life of the Church itself,”

This is what Christmas is all about- sharing the joy of Christ in our lives and his love with others. So, from the mission committee- THANK YOU from the very bottom of our Hearts!

Submitted by Linda Gruchala,

Mission/Outreach Coordinator